Indian researcher decoding diabetes in Australia

By Our Reporter
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Akram Ahmad

Reports are that India accounts for 49% of the world’s diabetes burden with 72 million cases in 2017 and an estimated 134 million in the next five years. Diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among Australians as well, with approximately 1.2 million people affected with it.

Currently, there are about 6,00,000 Indian migrants in Australia and there is higher prevalence of diabetes and hospitalisation due to its complications among Indian born migrants. Although there are number of studies done in India, there is no such data for Indian migrants in Australia.

Akram Ahmad, currently pursuing his PhD at the Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, is hoping to delve into the subject by studying ways to optimise medication taking in Indian migrants with Type-2 Diabetes.

Akram, 32, who hails from UP (India), received a full scholarship to pursue the PhD degree at Sydney University in 2017. He has earlier worked as an assistant professor at Teerthankar Mahaveer University, Moradabad (UP) and then as a lecturer at UCSI University in Malaysia. His present research project is titled “Treatment preferences of Indian migrants with Type 2 diabetes: a discrete choice experiment”. “The purpose of this online survey-based study is to investigate people’s preferences for conventional or Ayurvedic medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and investigate what factors could affect people’s preferences,” says Akram, who is currently looking for volunteers who he can fill online survey.

“There are eight choice tasks based on factors such as side effects of medicines, efficacy, dose frequency, dosage form and cost etc. It will take just 15 minutes to complete the online survey,” says Akram who is adds that information received will be anonymous and used only for research purposes. Participants have an opportunity to win one of three $30 Coles online vouchers.


For online survey click here. For more details, contact aahm7538@uni.sydney.edu.au or call +61290369551

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