Following a path

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Gippsland is a region east of Melbourne. The area itself is vast and needs months to explore it properly. Even then you will only taste what it offers. It’s renowned for its beauty, fertile soil and contributes much to our food source.

Planting anything in Gippsland will usually result in minimal effort for greater harvest. Sale, which is situated in East Gippsland is closer to my heart than many other places, as it is the town I raised my family for a period of 12 years and is the town where my family still resides. I’ve truly been spoilt to have lived in there.

Gippsland has magnificent beaches, places to get lost in the bush or climb mountains, rainforests to explore and become one with nature.

It is a slice of heaven. Known for it’s diversity it’s a favourite with many Melburnians wanting to get away.

While on getaways, we all have our own journeys and the universe often has plans that are different to our own.

It’s when faced with life’s challenges that we turn to different modalities to sort out our lives. Meditation has long been recognised and attributed to some pretty amazing things. The trouble with us, as human beings is we all want a quick fix and most of us are lazy.Meditation is commitment.

Well that’s what I used to think. A year ago I began practicing maum meditation. The process is based on throwing away our false minds. Now in order to accelerate the process I have flown from Melbourne to South Korea where I am attending a session at the main centre.

It’s cold with snow still falling. The weather though has been a little bipolar, like Melbourne, warm, wet, cold all in the space of a week. I am surrounded by people from all over the world who all have their own motivation for being here.

My first week has been intense. Up early and to bed late with the day filled with lectures, meditation and physical labour. I now know all about sesame plants and am an expert in picking the leaves. This has been my task for the week and is part of action meditation or yang nong in Korean. The rural country side is barren at this time of year. I sleep in a room with several other women on a mat. It sounds primitive, but it’s actually quite comfy.

We take our meals in a communal dining room. I’m still adjusting to the food. Although I’ve discovered a chicken that looks like KFC but runs rings around any chicken I’ve had before.

 

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